Thursday, 27 February 2014

10 Foods to Help Prevent Clogged Arteries 




Atherosclerosis (also known as arteriosclerotic vascular disease or ASVD) is a specific form of arteriosclerosis in which an artery wall thickens as a result of the accumulation of calcium and fatty materials such as cholesterol and triglyceride. It reduces the elasticity of the artery walls and therefore allows less blood to travel through. This also increases blood pressure. It is a syndrome affecting arterial blood vessels, a chronic inflammatory response in the walls of arteries, caused largely by the accumulation of macrophages and white blood cells and promoted by low-density lipoproteins (LDL, plasma proteins that carry cholesterol and triglycerides) without adequate removal of fats and cholesterol from the macrophages by functional high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (see apoA-1 Milano). It is commonly referred to as a hardening or furring of the arteries. It is caused by the formation of multiple plaques within the arteries (Anthea et al, 1993).

Moreover, atherosclerosis is especially dangerous because it is hidden deep in the body and not easily detectable. It is a slow, progressive disease.

10 Foods to Help Prevent Clogged Arteries 

Garlic
Since ancient times garlic has been used to treat heart disease and hypertension. According to a study published
in preventive medicine, garlic inhibits coronary artery calcification which serves as a marker for plaque
formation.

• Grapes
Grapes are rich in flavonoids, quercetin, and resveratrol. These flavonoids have been found to prevent the oxidation of bad cholesterol that leads to the formation of plaque in artery walls. They also lower the risk of developing blood clots that can lead to heart attacks.

• Spinach
Spinach is rich in potassium and folic acids, both of which act as a defense against high blood pressure. Spinach is also rich in lutein, a plant carotenoid which not only protects against age related macular degeneration but also
prevents heart attacks by keeping arteries free from cholesterol build up.

• Fish
A study conducted by researchers at Southampton University found that Omega 3 oils, present in fishes like
tuna and salmon, stop the build up of fatty deposits in the arteries. These fatty acids prevent clots from forming and cholesterol from becoming oxidized.


• Olive oil

Only oxidized cholesterol is able to stick to your artery walls and form plaques. Monounsaturated fats present in
olive oil when mixed with molecules of bad cholesterol become less likely to be oxidized.

• Tomatoes
According to a study conducted by Korean researchers, lycopene, a compound present in tomatoes that gives them their color, helps in prevent hardening of the arteries. Researchers found that women with the highest lycopene levels in their blood had the least stiffness in their arteries.

• Pomegranates
Pomegranate juice not only appears to prevent hardening of the arteries by reducing blood vessel damage, but may also reverse the progression of this disease. Pomegranate fruit and its juice are high in antioxidant content, which may help fight hardening of the arteries.

• Kiwi and Cantaloupe
These antioxidant-rich foods work by reducing toxic LDL cholesterol, which is formed by a rusting process in your
arteries. They can help stop the rust in its tracks and even prevent it from spreading. Eat one cup of cantaloupe or one kiwi per day to unclog your arteries.

• Cranberry juice
This juice strains the fat out of arteries. Instead of having fat build up in your blood vessels, this juice boosts your
cell’s ability to absorb the fat and use it for production of energy. Drink three glasses of this juice every week to
unclog your arteries.

• Oats
Thanks to the soluble fiber in oats, cholesterol doesn't stand a chance. This fiber attaches itself to cholesterol
and carries it right out of your system. Some studies have shown that eating just 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 cups of cooked oat-bran cereal daily can lower cholesterol levels by almost 20%.

Don't Forget check our post / blog on water therapy .....


send in your comments and share with your contacts 

www.gooddeedsmall.com 


Reference:

Maton, Anthea; Roshan L. Jean Hopkins, Charles William McLaughlin, Susan Johnson, Maryanna Quon Warner, David LaHart, Jill D. Wright (1993). Human Biology and Health. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-981176-1OCLC 32308337.